Filed in Beautiful Boy Dune Film Interview Upcoming projects

Timothée talks about ‘Beautiful Boy’ and ‘Dune’

Timothée gave an interview for Inquirer. You can read the whole thing at the link and some excerpts below.

Can you talk about your coming project, “Dune”? I saw on Google that Denis Villeneuve was going to do “Dune.” That was always like “The Dark Knight” by Christopher Nolan. I wanted to act in that film. It has always been my dream to do a big movie. And looking at the careers of Leonardo DiCaprio or Joaquin Phoenix, those guys exclusively work with great directors.

So I always told myself, if you do a big movie, make sure it’s with a really great director. I met Denis at the Hollywood Film Awards last year. I didn’t want to scare him away with my enthusiasm for the project, so I didn’t even bring it up. I just said, “Hi.”

I saw him over the course of last year. They went on a casting search and were looking to get someone younger than I am. I was just biding my time.

Denis saw me in “Call Me by Your Name,” but somebody snuck him a link to “Beautiful Boy.” Then, in the meeting I had with him, he told me he was going to be at the Cannes Film Festival. So he said, “If you will come to Cannes, we can meet and talk about it.”

So, I went to Cannes and then he said, “I saw ‘Call Me by Your Name’ and I thought you were great. I saw ‘Beautiful Boy’ and still thought you were great, but then I saw you take in ‘The King’ and I thought OK, whatever.” Which is funny to me because I hadn’t done it yet during that time and hopefully it’s presentable, but who knows?

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‘Beautiful Boy’ at TIFF

‘Beautiful Boy’ premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival last night and Timothée was in attendance. You can see images from the premiere and after party in the gallery. He also attended the IMDb studios earlier in the day and you can see images from that in the gallery as well, along with a video here or below. Some reviews have also popped up and you can read some highlights below.


In these scenes and others that find him lashing out at his astonished father, Chalamet once again illustrates an uncanny ability to merge with whatever the material demands of him. A far cry from the sexually adventurous teen of “Call Me By Your Name” or the obnoxious boyfriend of “Lady Bird,” he buries his hunky features under a messy mop of hair and a malleable expression. His face is a Roschach test of emotions, melting from grimace to eerie smirk as the character contends with the invisible processes of a shattered brain.

IndieWire

No matter how many times you look at Timothée Chalamet’s face, it always surprises you. He’s the rare actor you could call handsome and beautiful at the same time, and his pale stretchy features seem to wrap themselves around the emotions he’s feeling — or, in this movie, the lies he’s telling. In “Call Me by Your Name,” Chalamet had a marvelous directness, but in “Beautiful Boy” he’s transformed — he makes Nic, in his muffled millennial James Dean way, skittery and self-involved to the point of being a little disconnected.

Variety

The film is most interesting when it simply provides the opportunity to watch Chalamet. In his clean interludes, Nic is a lovely kid in every way; you’d never suspect there was a demon hiding inside him that would periodically take control of the slim body housing it. But then, of course, actors love the opportunities to go deep into madness and obsession. Chalamet is no exception but, in truth, he’s more exasperating and not as interesting in hooked mode as he is as a promising bright young thing. This guy should stay clean.

The Hollywood Reporter

As for Chalamet, he continues to be one of the most exciting young actors working today. He plays Nic not like a caricature of an addict, but someone with a unique history and specific personality that’s being drowned by his drug habit.

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Timothée Chalamet on getting put through the acting wringer in Beautiful Boy

EW, who released a new still from ‘Beautiful Boy’ just a few days ago, now also have a short new interview up with Timmy talking about the challenges of playing Nic Sheff. You can read the interview at the link above and a few choice excerpts here.

Rather than provide a neat arc toward recovery — as Hollywood has tended to do — Boy is propelled by relapses, estrangements, death scares, and the increasingly difficult decisions Nic’s family needs to make for his care.

[…]

Chalamet concedes that the atmosphere on set was “intense” given the material, but he also describes it as “dutiful.” “[It was] more a devotion to getting this story right,” he explains. “With high emotional family stakes at play, you feel a responsibility to the actual story…. We tried to capture someone in the throes of addiction, caught between, addled.”

[…]

The difference in years of experience between them wasn’t lost on Chalamet, who describes Carell’s work as “always honest and real.” He gushes, particularly, about the “moment to moment consistency” of Carell’s performance, from which he realized the importance of “letting things come to you in scenes, and not the other way around.” Yet Chalamet had a larger takeaway from observing his screen partner. “It was also the way [Steve] carried himself on set,” he explains. “He has this kind of incredible combination of humanity and professionalism, it makes you want to be around him and work with him.”

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Oscars + Independent Spirit Awards

Awards season is over and Timothée attended the last of the shows this past weekend. First up was the Independent Spirit Awards where he won the awards for Best Actor and also presented one to the Best Support Actor. Next up was the Academy Awards. Sadly, he didn’t win it, but I’m sure he will have many more nominations in the future. You can see all the event images in the gallery and see a few videos below.



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Timothée for Shortlist Magazine

Timothée is featured in the new issue of shortlist magazine. You can read the article here and see the images in the gallery in their full glory.


Chalamet’s meteoric rise, following a year in which Hollywood was tipped on its head, makes him one of the most interesting young men of 2018; remaining a powerful ally to the LGBT community, being vocal when men three times his age are silent; becoming the youngest Best Actor nominee at the Oscars since 1944 and knowing all the lyrics to Bodak Yellow. All of which we’ll get to, just as soon as he’s back from the doctors.

“Please, don’t hate me,” he says, in his car, during one of our conversations. We’ve been talking about the best bagels in New York – Tompkins Square Bagels, FYI – when Chalamet breaks the news that he needs to go for a physical. Like, now. “Are you going to kill me? I won’t be long! Promise. I’m really looking forward to continuing our cross-pond conversation. I mean it.”

[…]

A week later. It’s late. My phone rings. “Umm, hey,” he says. “I thought you might be asleep by now. No, I’m kidding. So, I have a good bill of health… I was getting a kind of regimen in order for a project. Just getting a bit of a head start. I’m back, so ask me anything.”

Anything? OK, what’s on his reading list at the moment? He thinks. “Hmm. What can I not put down… hang on.” He sets the phone aside and I can hear his footsteps thump around the house. “Hello? I have one. It’s called Turn Up The Heat: Unlock The Fat-Burning Power Of Your Metabolism.”

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‘Awards Chatter’ podcast

Timothée gave an interview for ‘Awards Chatter’, The Hollywood Reporter’s podcast. You can hear the whole thing here.

“It’s a dream come true in many ways,” says the 22-year-old actor Timothee Chalamet as we sit down at the offices of The Hollywood Reporter to record an episode of the ‘Awards Chatter’ podcast and begin discussing the last year in his life. During that time, he has appeared in three widely acclaimed films — Scott Cooper’s Hostiles, Greta Gerwig’s Lady Bird and Luca Guadagnino’s Call Me by Your Name — two of which are nominated for the best picture Oscar (Lady Bird and Call Me by Your Name). Moreover, for his portrayal of Elio, a young man who falls in love while on summer holiday in Italy, in Call Me by Your Name, he recently became the youngest best actor Oscar nominee in 78 years (since Mickey Rooney was nominated for Babes in Arms) and the first person born in the 1990s to receive a nomination for that award. On March 4, he could become the youngest person ever to win it. The specialness of what Chalamet is experiencing does not escape him: “This is a great moment,” he says with a smile.

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Timothée on the cover of GQ

Timothée graces the cover of the March issue of GQ. You can read the interview here, see images in the gallery in HQ and read a few excerpts below as well.


His is a brimming exuberance that’s reined in by a sober conscientiousness. Often there seem to be two competing forces pulling at either arm: the desire to let everything in, to not take any of this good fortune for granted, while also contending with a constant low-level fear of losing the thing he’s only just grabbed hold of. “Fuck yeah, while it’s going on, I’m going to enjoy every second of this—it sounds cheesy, but I think of myself as an actor third, an artist second, and a fan first,” he said. “But I have genuine fear of having the inability to replicate this moment again.”

He’s self-critical and cautious. He’s skeptical of “the artificial maturity that can accompany young actors.” He repeats often “that the male brain doesn’t fully develop until 25.” He’s wary of the pitfalls of early success and thinks constantly about fucking it up. It’s imperative to him that he not be “a flash in the pan, or do anything to encourage the idea that this is a moment, and a flavor of the month.… I look at the road map for young male actors, for young actors, and it’s not particularly healthy.” One way to protect himself, he knows, is to show up and make it clear how entirely appreciative he is of everything that’s happened this fall and winter, but then to disappear as quickly as possible back into a new project, back into the work.

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